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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The business world has a muddled view of the cybersecurity challenges and opportunities presented by the rollout of 5G networks and services, per a paper out yesterday.

Why it matters: Secure hardware and systems will be a must in order to fulfill the vision of a 5G future filled with ubiquitous super-fast internet and a plethora of connected devices. Business leaders having a dim understanding of where things stand on that front could presage some headaches to come.

By the numbers: Some 31% of 1,000 global business leaders and security professionals polled in September said they believe 5G will be fully secure at the network provider point, according to the report from AT&T Cybersecurity, formerly known as AlienVault, which AT&T acquired in 2018 and which runs the Open Threat Exchange for sharing cyber threat intelligence.

  • 26% said they have no strategic plan to address 5G security.
  • Yet 56% said they understand they'll have to tailor their approach to cybersecurity for 5G.

What they're saying: "These diametrically opposing beliefs sum up the conundrum facing enterprises as they transition to secure 5G," reads the report. "Nearly half of the survey respondents think 5G requires no change to their security infrastructure, while the other half understands that this shift demands a rework of the security posture to keep the business protected."

Yes, but: Despite the mixed messages, respondents said their companies, all organizations with at least 1,000 employees, are investing heavily in 5G cybersecurity.

  • Respondents implementing 5G said they now spend 18–23% of their total security budgets on 5G security and expect that to tick up to nearly a quarter of their budgets within 12–18 months.

Go deeper

National Security Council names Russia as "likely" origin of U.S. agency breach

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A U.S. task force responsible for investigating the massive cyberattack that breached the departments of Defense, State and Homeland Security — among others — identified the hack as "likely Russian in origin," per a joint statement on Tuesday.

Why it matters: This is the first time the federal government has formally named Russia as the likely origin of the attack.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.