Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

Republican FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr told Axios Monday that he’s looking forward to addressing state and local regulations he believes might be holding up 5G deployment. He also addressed the recent backlash against large internet companies and said he hadn’t been contacted by a watchdog probing the agency’s chairman.

Why it matters: Carr is the newest member of a Republican majority at the FCC that has been methodically deregulating the communications industry, which has implications for tech, media and telecom.

You've been a key player in developing the FCC's agenda on 5G infrastructure. What needs to happen next to bring 5G to consumers?

“As I have looked at the infrastructure docket I’ve divided it into two main buckets, one is the federal historic and environmental review side, which we’re doing this month. The next bucket is going to be taking a look at state and local laws and looking at our authorities under [the primary communications law] to make sure that we’re all headed in the same direction to enable that deployment... The other big piece of it obviously is spectrum and the chairman in Barcelona a couple weeks ago announced that we’re going to hold a 5G auction at the end of this [year.]”

What do you think of the FCC’s inspector general’s investigation into whether the chairman and his staff tried to help the right-leaning Sinclair Broadcast Group?

“I don’t have really an opinion on it one way or another.”

Before you were a commissioner you were a staffer for the agency and Chairman Pai. Have you been contacted by the IG’s office to provide anything?

“No, I haven’t.”

A big topic in Washington right now is the power of big tech companies. What do you make of that?

“I think in large measure this is one that is much more squarely in the bailiwick of the Federal Trade Commission, and we look for sort of their leadership on these issues. I mean I will say, from an FCC perspective, I do think this is why it ultimately was important and the right decision from my perspective when Congress enacted the privacy CRA [rolling back the FCC’s data privacy rules for broadband providers]. I think one of the things you saw there was an FCC that imposed much [more] stringent and heavier regulations on broadband providers than other players in the online ecosystem, the edge providers. One of the arguments there that was being made was that edge providers have a lot more insight and control over your personal data than broadband providers do. ... I think getting back to a uniform FTC approach made a lot of sense, and I think that sort of ties into this broader debate.”

You’re fairly new to this role at the commission. What’s something that’s surprised you?

“One thing that I’ve been struck with now that I am a commissioner is we go through some tough fights on the commission, obviously the vast majority of what we do doesn’t fall in that bucket, but there are ones — net neutrality, open internet, being an example — where all five of us had very strong individually-formed views on what we should do. What’s important is, and what I’ve seen people do on this commission, is we say our piece, we can be as fired up about it as we want to be, but then the next day to sit back down together and see where we can find common ground.”

Go deeper

9 mins ago - World

France recalls ambassadors from U.S. and Australia over submarine deal

Secretary of State Antony Blinken (L), French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (C), and French ambassador to the U.S. Philippe Etienne. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

France has taken the extraordinary step of recalling its ambassadors to the U.S. and Australia after both countries blindsided their French allies with a new military pact and submarine contract, the French Foreign Ministry announced on Friday.

The backstory: While sealing an agreement with the U.S. and U.K. to acquire nuclear submarines, Australia ripped up an existing $90 billion submarine deal with France. That led senior French officials to accuse the U.S. of a "stab in the back."

Updated 26 mins ago - World

In reversal, Pentagon now says drone strike killed 10 Afghan civilians

Caskets for the dead are carried towards the gravesite as relatives and friends attend a mass funeral for members of a family that is said to have been killed in a U.S. drone airstrike, in Kabul on Aug. 30. Photo: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A U.S. drone strike launched on Aug. 29 killed 10 civilians in Afghanistan, including seven children, rather than the Islamic State extremists the Biden administration claimed it targeted, the Pentagon said Friday.

Why it matters: U.S. Central Command said at the time that officials "know" the drone strike "disrupted an imminent ISIS-K threat" to Kabul's airport, and that they were "confident we successfully hit the target."

UN warns of "catastrophic" climate change failure without more emissions cuts

UN Secretary-General António Guterres at a news conference. Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP

A United Nations report released Friday warned that the planet will likely warm by more than 2.7 degrees Celsius by the end of the century unless governments take extra steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Why it matters: The report, released just months ahead of November's UN Climate Summit, highlights the growing pressure on global leaders to crack down on emissions to avert the worst effects of climate change.