Jun 9, 2017

Brain scans help to identify autism in infants

Evan Vucci / AP

A new type of brain scan may help physicians diagnose autism in children as young as six months old, reports NBC. In a study of 59 high-risk children, it was able to correctly identify 9 out of 11 children later diagnosed with autism.

Why it matters: Early detection of autism can help parents prepare for their child's development. An October 2016 report found working with parents to better their at-home communication with their children "reduced symptoms in children with severe autism for years". This was the first study of its kind and while researchers at UNC Chapel Hill noted that it has not been proven to work, early detection of autism in high-risk infants would allow the long-term effects to be further studied.

How it works: The team conducting these studies, made up of members at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of North Carolina, looked specifically at brain activity to identify autism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to look at structural changes in the brains of infants born with autism and functional connectivity MRI identified how regions of the brain communicate with one another during infancy. Together, the scans revealed differences that allowed researchers to correctly identify the nine children later diagnosed with autism.

The limitations: "No one has done this kind of study in six-month-olds before, and so it needs to replicated," Emerson said. "We hope to conduct a larger study soon with different study participants."

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America's dwindling executions

The Trump administration wants to reboot federal executions, pointing to a 16-year lapse, but Pew Research reports the government has only executed three people since 1963.

The big picture: Nearly all executions in the U.S. are done by states. Even those have been steadily dropping for two decades, per the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) — marking a downward trend for all executions in the country.

Top NSC official may be moved after "Anonymous" rumor fallout

President Trump at the Daytona 500. (Photo: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Top Trump administration officials are in discussions to reassign deputy national security adviser Victoria Coates to the Department of Energy from the National Security Council, per two sources familiar with the planning.

Why it matters: Coates' working relationship with National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien, who elevated her to the deputy role only months ago, has strained amid an effort by some people inside the administration to tag her as "Anonymous" — a charge she has vehemently denied to colleagues.

Jeff Bezos commits $10 billion for climate change research

Bezos at Amazon Smbhav in New Delhi on Jan. 15. Photo: Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced the launch of his "Earth Fund" on Monday via Instagram to fund climate change research and awareness.

What he's saying: Bezos says he's initially committing $10 billion to fund "scientists, activists, and NGOS" that are working on environmental preservation and protection efforts.