Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The Boston Globe's front page at the Newseum. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

The Boston Globe launched a campaign with hundreds of U.S. newspapers Wednesday evening criticizing President Trump for calling the American press an "enemy of the people."

The big picture: Though many organizations are participating in the campaign, several others have been critical of the effort. They argue that the president, like other United States citizens, has the right to his opinions about the press, and that the campaign infringes upon them.

What they're saying

The Wall Street Journal was one of the first papers to actively denounce the campaign. WSJ columnist James Freeman says the paper's editorial board was asked to join the coalition, but refused.

  • The invitation from the Globe presents an ethical problem for editorial boards around the country, he writes: "That’s because most editorial boards emphasize their independence from the newsrooms at their respective papers."
  • Although papers should properly criticize Trump when he tries to strip down others' first amendment writes, Freeman says papers cannot do the same to the president.

The Capital Gazette, where five journalists were killed in an attack earlier this summer, is among those who have not joined the Globe's coalition. Their editorial board says they declined because "the president’s opinion, frankly, is just not that important to us."

  • "We don’t feel coordinating with other news organizations will change the president’s appreciation of that," the editorial board writes. "Even if it did, you won’t suddenly find President Trump on the front page or at the top of our website."
  • The board says that, if they align with the coalition on anything, it's their common role as "watchdogs."

The L.A. Times also chose not to participate in the Globe's campaign, stating that it wants to keep its independence.

  • Columnist Nicholas Goldberg explains: "The Los Angeles Times editorial board does not speak for the New York Times or for the Boston Globe or the Chicago Tribune or the Denver Post."
  • In other words, the paper will condemn Trump's attacks in its own way if it chooses to do so. Goldberg also argues that the coalition finally gives Trump a reason to accuse the media of "collusion."
The other side

Despite pushback from some major organizations, the coalition is still plowing ahead with its editorial push, and more than 300 papers have already joined the campaign.

The coalition also received support from the U.S. Senate Thursday, which unanimously passed a non-binding resolution stating attacks with the goal of discrediting the media is "an attack on our democratic institutions."

Go deeper:

Go deeper

President Joe Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 35 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.

Updated 58 mins ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.