Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

American Airlines on Tuesday flew Boeing's 737 MAX for the first time in nearly two years, having been grounded since March 2019 after a pair of crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people just months apart, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The fatal crashes led to huge damage to Boeing's reputation and billions of dollars in costs.

  • The Federal Aviation Administration finally lifted Boeing's safety ban in November, but not before Congress attributed significant blame for the plane's shortcomings to both the company and the regulator.
  • A Senate committee released a report earlier this month finding that the FAA failed to conduct a proper review process of the MAX.

Details: American Airlines flight 718 left Miami Tuesday morning and is scheduled to land in New York in the afternoon before a return trip the same day, per the Times.

The big picture: Boeing expected orders for the MAX to increase once the ban was removed, but the coronavirus pandemic has caused a slump in travel and demand for new planes.

Go deeper: Boeing's dual crises

Go deeper

Jan 10, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Biden Inaugural Committee reveals Google and Microsoft among donors

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Biden Inaugural Committee published Saturday a list of donors that gave over $200 to President-elect Joe Biden’s Jan. 20 inauguration events — with Boeing, Google, Microsoft, Verizon and Comcast among the big-name contributors.

The big picture: The committee didn't disclose the donation amounts. The Federal Election Commission requires it to do so within 90 days following Inauguration Day. The committee has asked people to stay away during inaugural festivities, which will feature a "virtual parade across America," due to the pandemic.

Go deeper: Capitol assault reshapes Biden inauguration

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

1 hour ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!