Jul 15, 2019

Bobi Wine confirms he'll challenge Museveni for Uganda's presidency

Photo: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

Bobi Wine, the pop star-turned-opposition icon, confirmed today that he'll challenge Yoweri Museveni for Uganda's presidency in 2021.

Why it matters: Wine, 37, who was viciously beaten by soldiers last year and says Museveni's regime "wants me dead as soon as possible," told the AP: “there has never been a threat to this regime like the threat we pose to it today as a generation.”

The FT's David Pilling spent a recent afternoon in the slum where Wine was raised. Some excerpts from his great piece:

  • "Wine’s elevation to a symbol of Africa’s rising generation is no small responsibility in a continent where the median age is 19, and where urban youth engender both a sense of optimism for an Africa on the move and impending catastrophe as they seek jobs and political agency in a region dominated by out-of-touch autocrats."
  • "Not a single person who passes fails to recognise him. Many approach shouting slogans, clenching their fist, shaking hands, requesting help or posing for selfies. At one point, a crowd hoists him in the air, bouncing him through the streets like an Indian godhead."

What to watch: "Assuming Wine is alive by 2021, I wonder how he can possibly prevail in an electoral system where intimidation and rigging have been rife. His answer is to get millions of young people to register so that, he hopes, victory will be so decisive Museveni’s resolve will crumble."

Go deeper

Meet Generation Alpha, the 9-year-olds shaping our future

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

They're tech heavy, extremely connected and the most senior among them is about 9 years old. Say hello to Generation Alpha.

Why it matters: Millennials are reaching universal adulthood, and Generation Z is coming of age. Generation Alpha is falling in line as the next group to shape our future.

Go deeperArrowAug 8, 2019

Mick Mulvaney denies Trump has downplayed threat of white nationalism

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney defended President Trump on ABC's "This Week" against allegations that some of his past comments have downplayed the rising threat of white nationalism in the U.S., and that his divisive rhetoric is helping fuel violent domestic attacks like the shooting in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday.

Go deeperArrowAug 4, 2019

The other Amazons: E-commerce is booming in the developing world

Out for delivery. Photo: Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

In several emerging markets, entrepreneurs are using the Amazon playbook to bring e-commerce to their own countries, but they're finding that demand for online shopping is expanding faster than the infrastructure needed to support it.

The big picture: Serving populations that tend to rely on cash and live in harder-to-reach areas, the online retailers of the developing world are searching for creative ways to grow — and keep the international giants at bay.

Go deeperArrowAug 8, 2019