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A dozen states are considering raising gas taxes. That's after close to twenty other states have instituted hikes in recent years to pay for infrastructure. CBO data shows that even as inflation-adjusted federal spending on infrastructure fell 14% between 2010 and 2014, state and local spending fell even faster. That both sources of funding appear set to rise can only be a positive for economic growth.

Fake data accusations overblown? So says High Frequency Economics' Jim O'Sullivan, who argues in a research note that the uproar over a proposed change by the Trump Administration in how the U.S. Trade Representative compiles trade-deficit data is making a mountain of a molehill. O'Sullivan says that this is about making more data available that will paint a more sophisticated picture of U.S. trade, not asking the Census Bureau to stop reporting official trade deficits.

Earnings to watch: 1) Toll Brothers, which reports before the bell, illustrates headwinds the homebuilding sector still faces. 2) The stock market values Tesla Motors at $45 billion, or $5 billion less than Ford and $12 billion less than GM. That's despite selling just 76,000 vehicles last year to Ford's 2.6 million and GM's 3 million.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

First glimpse of the Biden market

Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Read: Pete Buttigieg's opening statement ahead of confirmation hearing

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to be secretary of transportation, in December. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/AFP via Getty Images

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to lead the Transportation Department, will tell senators he plans to prioritize the health and safety of public transportation systems during the pandemic — and look to infrastructure projects to rebuild the economy — according to a copy of his prepared remarks obtained by Axios.

Driving the news: Buttigieg will testify at 10 a.m. ET before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. He is expected to face a relatively smooth confirmation process, though GOP lawmakers may press him on "green" elements of Biden's transportation proposals.