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Demonstrators clash with police officers during a protest in Aurora, Colorado, on June 27. Photo: Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

The Business Roundtable called on Congress in a statement Wednesday to pass a police reform bill before its August recess.

Why it matters: The announcement by Business Roundtable, made up of CEOs of America’s 193 largest companies, reflects the rising pressure on corporations — from values-centric employees, shareholders and customers — to take stands on controversial public issues they once would have avoided.

The big picture: The business group issued a list of recommendations as Republicans and Democrats compete over differing police reform bills.

  • It recommends that Congress invest in community policing programs and creates a national police misconduct registry to catalog officer disciplinary records, which it believes will promote public accountability.
  • It also backs establishing a minimum national standard on the use of lethal and non-lethal force, banning chokeholds and carotid holds — except when deadly force is warranted — and creating higher standards for the use of no-knock warrants.

What they're saying: “Corporate America cannot sit this one out,” AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said in a statement. "CEOs are leaning forward and saying 'We have a problem.' You cannot watch the George Floyd video and say 'we don't have a problem.'"

  • "There's a national outcry for reform. With these policy recommendations as a starting point for possible bipartisan consensus, we call on all Members of Congress to act in urgency and get something done and signed into law before August."

Go deeper: The major police reforms that have been enacted since George Floyd's death

Go deeper

JPMorgan commits $30 billion to fight the racial wealth gap


Data: Fortune 500, Axios analysis of company statements, get the data; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon, Naema Ahmed/Axios

JPMorgan Chase announced Thursday a $30 billion investment over the next five years that the company says will address some of the largest drivers of the massive wealth gap between Black and white Americans.

  • The commitment makes the bank by far the largest monetary contributor to efforts by businesses to fight systemic inequality and racism in the U.S.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.