Jun 12, 2017

Between the lines on Trump's upcoming Cuba announcement

Ramon Espinosa / AP

With President Trump planning to fly to Miami on Friday to announce a Cuba policy that at least partly reverses President Obama's openings for commerce and travel after a half-century standoff, we asked officials inside and outside the White House to help us read between the lines:

  • The base loves a little Obama-appeasement rhetoric, and Trump plans to give it to 'em.
  • This was a campaign promise that won Trump some vital South Florida endorsements at a crucial time.
  • This is a chance for Trump to project personal and national strength.
  • It's a reminder the president can do consequential, historic things without Congress. But if you're Obama, it's also a reminder that such changes can be fleeting.
  • Big win for Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who tutored Trump on the issue (including in debates), and kept prodding for this announcement. Look for Rubio at Trump's event.

L.A. Times lead story, "Trump plans a reversal on ties with Cuba," by Tracy Wilkinson: "The move will be controversial. It could dull a boom in tourism by Americans to Cuba and hurt a burgeoning cottage industry of private enterprise on the socialist-ruled island. And it could allow Russia and China to more easily step in to fill the void."

  • "Some Trump supporters argue however that President Raul Castro has failed to improve human rights or expand political freedoms and does not deserve better relations with the U.S."

Go deeper

Warren sees bump in national poll following Nevada debate

Photo by David Becker/Getty Images.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren surged to 19% and second place in a CBS News/YouGov national poll released Sunday, trailing front-runner Sen. Bernie Sanders (28%) but edging out Joe Biden (17%) and Michael Bloomberg (13%).

Why it matters: The poll notes that only 42% of Democratic primary voters have made up their minds. While Warren underperformed in the first three states, her strong debate performance in Nevada last week may have given her campaign new life.

Pence aide says intel report of Russia helping Trump is "false information"

Marc Short. Screenshot: Fox News

Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, claimed on "Fox News Sunday" that the White House has not received intelligence that Russia is seeking to help President Trump win re-election, calling it "false information" that has been selectively leaked by Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee.

The big picture: Short and national security adviser Robert O'Brien both dismissed reports published in the Washington Post and New York Times last week about a briefing provided by top election security official Shelby Pierson, an aide to outgoing acting director of national intelligence Joseph Maguire.

Bernie's juggernaut

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks in San Antonio last night with his wife, Jane. Photo: Eric Gay/AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders won so big in the Nevada caucuses that Democrats are hard-pressed to sketch a way he's not their nominee.

Driving the news: With 60% of precincts counted (slow, but better than Iowa!), Sanders is running away with 46% of delegates — crushing Joe Biden's 20%, Pete Buttigieg's 15%, Sen. Elizabeth Warren's 10% and Sen. Amy Klobuchar's 5%.