Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke with locals in Sand Springs, Oklahoma. Photo: Beto O’Rourke/Facebook

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Sunday toured Tulsa communities on the Arkansas River in Oklahoma that have been devastated by severe weather and historic flooding.

Details: O'Rourke vowed if he were elected in 2020, he'd direct federal grants to invest in communities before natural disasters strike as climate change is due to worsen the situation, the Oklahoman reports.

The big picture: President Trump declared a major disaster in Oklahoma Saturday, making federal funding available to Tulsa, Muskogee and Wagoner counties. Waters are now receding in the area. But as Oklahoma clears up, the high waters are traveling southeast along the Arkansas River.

The latest: Downriver Arkansas communities were preparing Sunday for record-breaking crests, per AP. Flooding caused police to close multiple roads in North Little Rock Sunday night, according to KATV.

Go deeper: Beto O'Rourke on the issues, in under 500 words

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How small businesses got stiffed by the coronavirus pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

Apple's antitrust fight turns Epic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Millions of angry gamers may soon join the chorus of voices calling for an antitrust crackdown on Apple, as the iPhone giant faces a new lawsuit and PR blitz from Epic Games, maker of mega-hit Fortnite.

Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.

Survey: Fears grow about Social Security’s future

Data: AARP survey of 1,441 U.S. adults conducted July 14–27, 2020 a ±3.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Younger Americans are increasingly concerned that Social Security won't be enough to wholly fall back on once they retire, according to a survey conducted by AARP — in honor of today's 85th anniversary of the program — given first to Axios.

Why it matters: Young people's concerns about financial insecurity once they're on a restricted income are rising — and that generation is worried the program, which currently pays out to 65 million beneficiaries, won't be enough to sustain them.