Beto O'Rourke. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Editor's Note: O'Rourke dropped out of contention for the Democratic presidential nomination on Nov. 1, 2019. Below is our original article on his candidacy.

Key facts:
  • Age: 46
  • Born: El Paso
  • Undergraduate: Columbia University
  • Date candidacy announced: March 14, 2019
  • % of votes in line with Trump, per FiveThirtyEight: 30.1%
  • Previous roles: 3-term representative for Texas' 16th district, served on El Paso City Council 2005–2011.
Stance on key issues:
  • Health care: Has vacillated between endorsing single-payer and Medicare for All, opting to put stock in Medicare for America, which aims to expand "government-run health coverage while keeping employer-sponsored insurance plans," CNN reports.
  • Climate change: Proposed a $5 trillion-plan to address climate change, aiming for net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.
  • Taxes: Has derided business tax cuts and opposed 2017's GOP tax overhaul. O’Rourke voted in favor of an oil tax in 2016 that would have taxed $10 per barrel of crude oil.
  • Gun control: Called for universal background checks and limits on sale of AR-15s. Opposes requiring states to recognize concealed carry permits granted in other states.
  • Immigration: Vocal critic of Trump's border wall and said U.S. should not criminalize migrants who request asylum between ports of entry.
  • Supreme Court reform: Considers having 5 justices selected by Democrats and 5 by Republicans. 5 more would be selected totaling 20. Has also considered term limits.
  • College: Not on the bill for debt-free college — but supports forgiving student loan debt for public school teachers.
  • Minimum wage: Supports increasing minimum wage to $15/hour.
  • Marijuana: Favors decriminalization and expunging criminal records for cannabis-related offenses.
  • Transparency: Would require cabinet to hold monthly town halls.
  • Big Tech: Doesn't support breaking up Big Tech firms, claiming that would not "ensure dynamism in our economy and address corporate concentration."
  • Voting rights: Announced goal of registering more than 50 million voters and ensuring that 35 million more votes are cast in 2024.
  • Inequality: End racial disparities in education by investing $500 billion towards school-district funding gaps.
Key criticisms:
  • Business policy: Has voted in favor of bills that Democrats say would reduce independent audits of corporations. He was a member of the New Democrat Coalition, which aligned closely with business interests.
  • Teenage years: When he was 15, he wrote a piece of fiction about killing children. He has since expressed regret: "I’m mortified to read it now, incredibly embarrassed, but I have to take ownership of my words."
  • Hacking: Was a member of America's oldest hacking group, Cult of the Dead Cow, in the 1980s.
1 fun thing
  • O'Rourke used to play in a punk band, Foss, and founded a software company.

Go deeper: Everything you need to know about the other 2020 candidates

Editor's note: This story has been updated to note that O'Rourke visited all 254 Texas counties, not districts.

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