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The presidential election is coming down to key battleground states. Joe Biden was projected on Wednesday to win Wisconsin and Michigan, both of which President Trump won in 2016. These are also among the states where the president's campaign filed lawsuits to challenge the vote.

How successful are these suits likely to be? Noah Feldman is a constitutional law professor at Harvard Law and host of the Deep Background podcast with our partners at Pushkin Industries.

  • Plus, what's happening in the House and Senate races.

Guests: Noah Feldman, constitutional law professor at Harvard University and Jessica Taylor, Senate and Governors editor at The Cook Political Report.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Carol Wu, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Dan Bobkoff, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Alex Sugiura and Naomi Shavin. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

Go deeper:

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Trump challenges cement Biden triumph

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's frantic post-election challenges are having the opposite effect of what he intended: He's documenting his demise through a series of court fights and recounts showing Joe Biden's victory to be all the more obvious and unassailable.

Why it matters: The president’s push to overturn the election results is dispelling the cloud of corruption he alleged by forcing states to create a verified — and legally binding — accounting of his election loss.

Updated 4 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Vaccines: Here's key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines — Oxford University's 90%-effective vaccine — New deals in the COVID economy.
  2. Health: U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations keep breaking recordsWhy we're numb to 250,000 coronavirus deaths — Americans line up for testing ahead of Thanksgiving.
  3. Travel: Air travel's COVID-created future — Over 1 million U.S. travelers flew on Friday, despite calls to avoid holiday travel.
  4. Politics: California governor and family in quarantine — Sen. Kelly Loeffler to continue quarantine — Operation Warp Speed leader: COVID vaccine push is "isolated from a political environment."
  5. World: England to impose stricter regional systemU.S. coronavirus hotspots far outpacing Europe's — Portugal to ban domestic travel for national holidays.
  6. Economy: The biggest pandemic labor market drags.
  7. Sports: Coronavirus precautions leave college basketball schedule in flux.

Biden transition names first Cabinet nominees

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden on Monday unveiled his nominations for top national security positions in his administration, tapping former secretary of state John Kerry as his climate czar and former deputy national security adviser Avril Haines as director of national intelligence.

Why it matters: Haines, if confirmed, would make history as the first woman to oversee the U.S. intelligence community. Biden also plans to nominate Alejandro Mayorkas to become the first Latino secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.