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In the past few weeks, bestseller lists, streaming and gaming platforms have been full of books, shows and songs about racism in America. As demand for this type of content grows, streaming companies are featuring it more prominently — and it could have a lasting impact.

  • Plus, how President Trump is using the coronavirus pandemic to push his immigration agenda.
  • And Axios co-founder Mike Allen shares a new poll showing how college students feel about going back to school and partying during the pandemic.

Guests: Axios' Sara Fischer, Stef Kight and Mike Allen.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Naomi Shavin, Nuria Marquez Martinez and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Sep 29, 2020 - Podcasts

The evolution of fake news

Foreign and domestic actors are no longer using bots and fake accounts to influence the 2020 election. Now, bad actors are trying to trick journalists intro amplifying fake storylines.

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.

Janet Yellen plays down debt, tax hike concerns in confirmation hearing

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen at an event in December. (Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images)

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, pushed back against two key concerns from Republican senators at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday: the country's debt and the incoming administration's plans to eventually raise taxes.

Driving the news: Yellen — who's expected to win confirmation — said spending big now will prevent the U.S. from having to dig out of a deeper hole later. She also said the Biden administration's priority right now is coronavirus relief, not raising taxes.