Voting by mail has become a controversial issue for President Trump's re-election campaign. He talked to chief political correspondent Jonathan Swan about his lack of confidence in the system in his "Axios on HBO" interview. While Trump continues to sow fear around mail-in voting, a new Axios-Ipsos poll shows a partisan divide on the dangers of in-person voting.

  • Plus, how the U.S. is now playing by China's internet rules.
  • And, the rise in women-focused newsrooms.

Guests: Axios' Margaret Talev, Scott Rosenberg, and Sara Fischer.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Sep 21, 2020 - Podcasts

What’s next for the Supreme Court

The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg set off a flurry of activity in Washington this weekend, as hundreds of people who gathered on the court's steps to mourn and politicians mobilized over the fight for her replacement We look at what's next for the court and how both sides of the aisle are thinking about the nomination process.

How "naked ballots" could upend mail-in voting in Pennsylvania

Trump signs in Olyphant, Penn. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Pennsylvania's Supreme Court ordered state officials last week to throw out mail-in ballots submitted without a required inner "secrecy" envelope in November's election, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

The state of play: The decision went under the radar alongside the simultaneous decision to extend the time that mail-in ballots could be counted, but Philadelphia's top elections official warned state legislators this week that throwing out so-called "naked ballots" could bring "electoral chaos" to the state and cause "tens of thousands of votes" to be thrown out — potentially tipping the presidential election.

Commission releases topics for first presidential debate

Moderator Chris Wallace. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fox News anchor Chris Wallace has selected what topics he'll cover while moderating the first presidential debate between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden next week.

What to watch: Topics for the Sept. 29 debate will include Trump and Biden's records, the Supreme Court, COVID-19, economic policy, racism and the integrity of the election, the Commission for Presidential Debates announced on Tuesday. Each topic will receive 15 minutes of conversation and will be presented in no particular order.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!