The consensus among economists is that the U.S. recovery will most likely be something in between a V and a W — a sharp drop, a relatively small bounce back, and then a long period of slow growth.

  • Time to pay attention again: The coronavirus surge is real, and it's everywhere in the United States.
  • And Axios co-founder Mike Allen tells us what to expect at the virtual Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee.

Guests: Axios' Felix Salmon, Sam Baker, and Mike Allen.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Naomi Shavin, Nuria Marquez Martinez and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

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7 mins ago - Health

Top business leaders urge White House to develop mandatory mask guidelines

A man walks past a Ramen restaurant in Los Angeles, California on July 1. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The heads of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Business Roundtable, National Retail Federation and other top business organizations wrote an open letter on Thursday urging the White House coronavirus task force to work with governors to make face coverings mandatory in all public spaces.

Driving the news: An analysis led by Goldman Sachs' chief economist found that a national mandate requiring face coverings would "could potentially substitute for lockdowns that would otherwise subtract nearly 5% from GDP," the Washington Post reports.