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As Congress moves forward with impeachment proceedings, corporate America is pulling the plug on political donations.

First, it was Big Tech banning President Trump from social media sites. Now large companies like BP, Dow and Marriott International are cutting off political donations. Some like Dow and Marriott said they won’t donate to lawmakers who voted to object to the Electoral College certification. Others like BP are pausing all political contributions.

  • Plus, how to navigate a new rule on hospital prices.
  • And, car buying moves into the 21st century.

Guests: Axios' Felix Salmon and Joann Muller and Dan Weissmann, host of An Arm and a Leg.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Carol Wu, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

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  • Plus, why a procedural Senate vote yesterday really matters for the upcoming impeachment trial.
  • And, Melinda Gates on how to help women get through the pandemic.

How cutting GOP corporate cash could backfire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Companies pulling back on political donations, particularly to members of Congress who voted against certifying President Biden's election win, could inadvertently push Republicans to embrace their party's rightward fringe.

Why it matters: Scores of corporate PACs have paused, scaled back or entirely abandoned their political giving programs. While designed to distance those companies from events that coincided with this month's deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol, research suggests the moves could actually empower the far-right.

Jan 26, 2021 - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.