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After months of back and forth on a new coronavirus stimulus bill, it's now even less likely one will pass before the election as members of Congress shift their focus toward their own re-election campaigns and a Supreme Court pick.

  • Plus, some not-bad news about our economic recovery.
  • And, on the road with the Biden campaign.

Guests: Axios' Alayna Treene, Felix Salmon and Hans Nichols.

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Alex Sugiura and Naomi Shavin. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Nov 25, 2020 - Podcasts

How the transition affects you

President-elect Joe Biden and his team can now officially begin the transition of power. But President Trump's delay cost the new administration 20 days of highly valuable planning time that is essential to pulling off a smooth transition of power across multiple agencies in the vast federal government. Bestselling author Michael Lewis joins us for an exclusive interview.

  • Plus, the reality of 2020 holiday shopping.
Off the Rails

Episode 4: Trump turns on Barr

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Drew Angerer, Pool/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 4: Trump torches what is arguably the most consequential relationship in his Cabinet.

Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.