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Axios Review: Google Pixelbook worthy option for always-connected

Photos: Google

Google's Pixelbook is the company's latest effort to show that its Chrome OS can be used for more than just a lower-budget, part-time Web browsing device. The company has made a lot of improvements since the Chromebook Pixel, including support for Android apps, a digital pen and the voice powered Google Assistant. The Pixelbook also folds into a tent or tablet, making it a nice option for watching movies or surfing on a couch.

The bottom line: The Pixelbook is a worthy, if not inexpensive, option for those who always (or nearly always) have an Internet connection.

My biggest test for the Chromebook was whether I could do my real work on it— and the answer was yes. I was able to write this review, open and read attachments. The biggest adjustment was that the control key needed for the copy and paste shortcut was in a different place than on a Mac, which took some getting used to.

Downloading Android apps was a plus, but I needed to sign out of my corporate Gmail account and use a personal one to get that feature to work. Once I did, though, I was able to combine the fast browser with separate windows for apps like Slack and Twitter.

Who it's good for: People that want a fast, secure browser and don't mind paying as much as they would for an ultra-thin laptop.

Who it's not: People that need a specific desktop app or frequently lack a connection might be better off with a traditional laptop.

The practicalities: The Pixelbook hits stores Oct. 31 and costs $999.

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