Photos: Google

Google's Pixelbook is the company's latest effort to show that its Chrome OS can be used for more than just a lower-budget, part-time Web browsing device. The company has made a lot of improvements since the Chromebook Pixel, including support for Android apps, a digital pen and the voice powered Google Assistant. The Pixelbook also folds into a tent or tablet, making it a nice option for watching movies or surfing on a couch.

The bottom line: The Pixelbook is a worthy, if not inexpensive, option for those who always (or nearly always) have an Internet connection.

My biggest test for the Chromebook was whether I could do my real work on it— and the answer was yes. I was able to write this review, open and read attachments. The biggest adjustment was that the control key needed for the copy and paste shortcut was in a different place than on a Mac, which took some getting used to.

Downloading Android apps was a plus, but I needed to sign out of my corporate Gmail account and use a personal one to get that feature to work. Once I did, though, I was able to combine the fast browser with separate windows for apps like Slack and Twitter.

Who it's good for: People that want a fast, secure browser and don't mind paying as much as they would for an ultra-thin laptop.

Who it's not: People that need a specific desktop app or frequently lack a connection might be better off with a traditional laptop.

The practicalities: The Pixelbook hits stores Oct. 31 and costs $999.

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Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 19,680,042 — Total deaths: 727,777 — Total recoveries — 11,962,565Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 5,002,523 — Total deaths: 162,455 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Nancy Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on employment — Trump adviser Larry Kudlow says he regrets suggesting the benefits could only be extended by Congress.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — Poll: 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Schools: Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral — How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.

Blumenthal calls classified briefing on Russian interference "absolutely chilling"

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D- Conn.) called on the Trump administration to declassify intelligence detailing Russian efforts to influence the 2020 elections, telling MSNBC on Sunday that the classified briefing lawmakers received about the Kremlin's activities this week was "absolutely chilling."

The big picture: National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director William Evanina said in a statement Friday that the Russian government is "using a range of measures" to "denigrate" Joe Biden ahead of the election. China and Iran would prefer that Trump is defeated, according to Evanina.

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Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS News' "Face the Nation" that the coronavirus death toll in the U.S. will be "definitely" somewhere between 200,000 and 300,000 by the end of 2020.

Why it matters: "Whether we're closer to 200,000 or closer to 300,000 depends on what we do now and how it evolves," Gottlieb warned on Sunday as the U.S. surpassed five million confirmed coronavirus cases.