Jun 2, 2017

Axios launches Future of Work

Today Axios announces its newest digital stream "Future of Work," and a weekly newsletter will debut on June 4.

Future of Work will cover the coming biggest story of our lives: the impact of robots and artificial intelligence on jobs and global economics. Steve LeVine, Future of Work Editor, will highlight the socio-economic impacts of technology, with an emphasis on how new developments in artificial intelligence and robotics will affect people, countries and organizations throughout the world.

The Future of Work newsletter will give Axios readers an inside look in trends disrupting the workforce alongside leading experts' views on how to best tackle the opportunities and challenges accompanying this change.

Why it matters: "Whether they lead companies or help run government or are a part of shaping massive organizations, our readers are deeply engaged with the latest trends and innovations impacting work worldwide," said Axios Co-Founder and CEO Jim VandeHei, "Future of Work is a must-read for those seeking to keep up with the latest technologies and the cultural and economic disruptions they will cause."

One fun thing: The Future of Work stream will feature a new video series "Almost Now" taking viewers to the front lines to show the technology and the disrupters leading the charge of modernization. Here's a teaser trailer for a sneak peak.

Axios is excited to announce that our launch sponsor for Future of Work is Walmart.

See the Future of Work stream and sign up for the newsletter.

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