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Jeffrey Rosen. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen on late Tuesday warned that the Justice Department will have "no tolerance whatsoever" for anyone looking to disturb President-elect Biden's inauguration.

What he's saying: "I want to send a clear message to anyone contemplating violence, threats of violence or other criminal conduct: We will have no tolerance whatsoever for any attempts to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power on Jan. 20 that our Constitution calls for," Rosen said in his first appearance since last week's Capitol siege.

  • "We will have no tolerance for any attempts to forcefully occupy government buildings. There will be no excuse for violence, vandalism or any other form of lawlessness," he continued.

The big picture: The video comes as lawmakers pressure law enforcement to investigate how Trump supporters successfully stormed the Capitol in an attempt to stop the election result certification.

  • Several senators last week sent a letter to the DOJ and the FBI calling for a detailed report on how the agencies are investigating those involved in the riots.

The bottom line: Several locations in Washington D.C. will be on lockdown starting Wednesday, six days earlier than originally planned, as law enforcement prepare for potential demonstrations ahead of the inauguration.

Go deeper

AP: Justice Dept. rescinds "zero tolerance" policy

A young girl waves to onlookers through the fence at the U.S.-Mexico border wall in San Ysidro, California, in Nov. 2018. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden's acting Attorney General Monty Wilkinson issued a memo on Tuesday to revoke the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, which separated thousands of migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border, AP first reported.

Driving the news: A recent report by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz emphasized the internal chaos at the agency over the implementation of the policy, which resulted in 545 parents separated from their children as of October 2020.

Capitol Police chief apologizes for failures during Jan. 6 siege

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Acting Chief of U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) Yogananda Pittman told Congress on Tuesday that the department "failed to meet its own high standards" during the Capitol riots on Jan. 6, referring to the event as a "terrorist attack," and they did not take the necessary steps to address the "strong potential for violence," according to prepared remarks obtained by CNN.

Why it matters: The pro-Trump riot at the Capitol earlier this month resulted in five deaths, including the death of a Capitol police officer, dozens of arrests and the resignation of former USCP Chief Steven Sund.

Chauvin defense closing: "Does not have to prove his innocence"

Chauvin's defense attorney Eric Nelson opened his closing argument on Monday by reminding the jury that Derek Chauvin "does not have to prove his innocence."

Why it matters: The jury's verdict in Chauvin's murder trial is seen by advocates as one of the most crucial civil rights cases in decades.