Feb 6, 2020 - Economy & Business

Atari inks deal for game-themed hotels

Photo: Atari

As many as eight Atari-branded hotels will pop up around the country, with the first one breaking ground in Phoenix this year.

The state of play: Austin, Las Vegas, Chicago, Denver, Seattle, San Jose and San Francisco are also in line, reports the Phoenix Business Journal.

“I like rebooting stuff from the '80s from when I was a kid, and I thought it would be so cool to do real estate. Experiential is really popular right now."
— Phoenix entrepreneur Napoleon Smith III, who pulled off other old-school brand reboots like Teenage Mutant Ninja turtles, per the Business Journal

Among the hotel's amenities: An esports studio, gaming playground and a movie theater. Guest rooms will come with enough bandwidth for multiple people to stream and play online games during their stay.

  • Paris-based Atari will receive 5% of the hotels' revenue, per the announcement.

Go deeper: Marriott will replace mini toiletries in its hotels by 2020

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Where American city-dwellers want to move

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

A fascinating new project from the rental search platform Apartment List pulls together piles of data to show where renters in every U.S. metro are moving to and from.

The big picture: Americans are moving at the lowest rates since the Census Bureau began tracking domestic relocations in 1947. Fewer than 10% of Americans moved to new places in 2018-2019.

Go deeperArrowJan 29, 2020

Overwatch League is taking esports local in 2020

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Over its first two seasons, the Overwatch League's city-based esports franchises played their matches in a designated arena in L.A. This year, the league goes local, with all 20 teams hosting competitions in their home cities. This weekend's hosts: NYC and Dallas.

Why it matters: This home-and-away format represents a giant leap in the maturation of an esports league that eventually wants to look like the NFL, except on an international scale, according to Bobby Kotick, CEO of Activision Blizzard, which developed the game and operates the league.

Go deeperArrowFeb 6, 2020 - Sports

AI re-pricing software for hotels, flights could hurt deal-hungry consumers

A flight taking off in 2019. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Hotels and airlines are now using artificial intelligence software to re-price tickets and stays, sometimes dozens of times a day, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: More often than not this is resulting in higher prices for consumers, as great deals are removed from travel websites and replaced by higher prices when the AI software notices increasing demand.

Go deeperArrowJan 29, 2020