Apr 18, 2017

Artificial Intelligence is really good at predicting heart attacks

Better than the guidelines doctors use, in fact. That's the conclusion of a new study written up in Science magazine. Here's how they tested it: A UK epidemiologist and his colleagues tested four machine-learning algorithms against the doctors' guidelines, to see how well they could predict which patients would have heart troubles based on 2005 medical records. Sure enough, the artificial intelligence programs did a better job of predicting who actually had heart attacks and other problems within the next 10 years.

What it means: If computers can teach themselves, they may be able to account for a lot of random factors with people's health, more than doctors can keep track of themselves. If these programs had actually been used, the study's authors said, 355 people's lives could have been saved.

Yes, but: Given how much trouble doctors have had with electronic medical records, are they really going to be enthusiastic about adding even more technology to their practices?

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America's future looks a lot like Nevada

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today's Nevada caucus will foreshadow the future of American politics well beyond 2020.

Why it matters: The U.S. is in the midst of a demographic transformation, and the country's future looks a lot like Nevada's present. Today's results, in addition to shaping the 2020 race, will help tell us where politics is headed in a rapidly changing country.

Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,359 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 14 hours ago - Health