Arlington National Cemetery. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Arlington National Cemetery is rapidly approaching the point where it won't have space for new burials, and could be full in 25 years at the current pace, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: The cemetery is the most prominent of its kind in the country, and sees around 7,000 burials a year. But the Army, who runs Arlington, is considering only allowing those who were killed in action or awarded the Medal of Honor to be buried there.

What's next: Per the Times, the Army is "conducting a survey of public opinion" regarding the issue through this summer, and is expected to officially recommend a solution this fall.

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), a former Army infantry officer who led combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, and in between was a platoon leader with the Old Guard at Arlington National Cemetery:

  • “Memorial Day began as Decoration Day, as communities and families decorated the graves of fallen soldiers with flags and flowers. The tradition continues today across our land, with flags and flowers adorning patriot graves ... Their stories inspire our souls and give us all a renewed attachment to the noble country whose flag they wore in their final moments."

Go deeper with the NYT: The photos by Damon Winter are worthy of your time.

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SurveyMonkey poll: Trump improves, but not enough

Trump and Biden during the final debate. Photo: Xinhua/Liu Jie via Getty Images

President Trump's final debate performance exceeded Americans' expectations, but it wasn't enough to shift the dynamics that left him trailing Joe Biden across most measures, according to a new Axios-SurveyMonkey poll.

What they're saying: "Liar" was the word used most by debate watchers to describe Trump's performance, followed by "lies," "strong," "presidential" and "childish." "Presidential" was the word used most to describe Biden's performance, followed by "liar," "weak," "expected" and "honest."

Hunter Biden saga dominates online debate

Data: NewsWhip; Table: Axios Visuals

The mainstream media turned away. But online, President Trump's charges about Hunter Biden were by far the dominant storyline about the final presidential debate, according to exclusive NewsWhip data provided to Axios.

  • Coverage of business dealings by Joe Biden's son — and pre-debate allegations by one of his former business associates, Tony Bobulinski — garnered more than twice as much online activity (likes, comments, shares) as the runner-up.