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Wilman Hernandez and his wife Brenda Ramirez, check their phones for the location of shelters and their capacity while waiting for a bus in Miami Beach, Fla., Friday, Sept. 9, 2017. Photo: Marta Lavandier/AP

As seen during Hurricane Harvey, social media and apps can be extremely helpful during storms and crisis situations. Now, with Florida preparing for Irma, people are downloading various weather and communication apps to stay connected during the storm.

Here are some of the most useful apps:

  • The hurricane app from the Red Cross: monitor local storm conditions and connect with others to let them know you're safe.
  • NOAA Radar U.S.: The number one paid app for hurricane tracking, per the Miami Herald.
  • Zello Walkie Talkie app: This free app has already been downloaded by over a million people preparing for Irma, per NBC. However, it won't work if there is no cell service or Wi-Fi.
  • FireChat: A free messaging app that doesn't need cell service or internet access to work.
  • GasBuddy: Find gas near you for the cheapest prices, using data submitted by other users in the area.
  • Snapchat: Stay up-to-date on what's happening in your area through videos posted by users near you with Snapchat's new Snap Map feature.
  • WhatsApp: This communication app "offers fast, simple, secure messaging and calling for free around the world."
  • Nextdoor: Through Nextdoor, neighborhoods can communicate on a "private social network."
  • Waze: A navigation app, Waze projects what the roads in your area look like based on real-time road and traffic information submitted by other drivers.

Go deeper

Journalism enters dangerous new era

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

The Capitol attack on Jan. 6 resulted in at least nine physical assaults against journalists and at least five arrests, per the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker's top editor.

Why it matters: President Trump's harsh rhetoric towards the press has empowered leaders abroad and locally in the U.S. to continue to attack press that they don't like.

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The beginning of the beginning for Biden's climate push

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Joe Biden's inauguration and the days right after will bring a rat-tat-tat burst of climate policy moves, but keep this in mind amid the splashy pledges: pushing through most of his agenda will be a long, uncertain slog.

Why it matters: Biden's climate plan is far more expansive than anything contemplated under President Obama. But for all the immediate pledges, it will take years to see how far Biden gets.

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Biden's inflation danger

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus proposal has economists and bullish market analysts revising their U.S. growth expectations higher, predicting a reflation of the economy in 2021 and possibly more booming returns for risk assets.

Yes, but: Others are warning that what's expected to be reflation could actually show up as inflation, a much less welcome phenomenon.

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