Apple CEO Tim Cook during a new-product announcement last year in Cupertino, CA. Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

"Apple's Top New Phone to Be Called 'iPhone X,' Code Leaks Show," by Bloomberg's Mark Gurman: "Strings of software code inside of the leaked operating system ... show the expected three new phones will be called the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X."

  • "The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are successors to the current iPhone models, while the iPhone X is the premium version with an all-new design, crisper OLED screen, improved cameras, and a 3-D facial recognition scanner for unlocking the device."
  • "The 'X' in the iPhone's name may be a reference to this model being a special 10th anniversary edition."

Why Tuesday's announcement matters, per WashPost's Hayley Tsukayama and Jena McGregor:

  • "This [iPhone] iteration could prove a test of [Apple's] consumer tech dominance as it faces a bevy of challenges: Samsung seems to have resumed its smartphone momentum with the new Galaxy Note 8, Apple trails competitors such as Google in the home hub space, Siri's artificial intelligence isn't as advanced as others, and it is losing to Amazon.com as an entertainment innovator.
  • "Is this the moment [Apple and CEO Tim Cook] reclaim the mantle as tech's top innovator?"
  • "Apple fans, who crave the days when the company changed the world with revolutionary products, are eager to see more ... industry-disrupting ideas."

Go deeper ... I recommend this sneak peek from Frank Foer's must-read book out Tuesday, "World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech." An adaptation runs on the cover of WashPost Outlook, "How Silicon Valley is erasing your individuality: The perils of monopoly":

  • "[T]he tech companies ... have compiled an intimate portrait of the psyche of each user — a portrait that they hope to exploit to seduce us into a compulsive spree of binge clicking and watching. And it works: On average, each Facebook user spends one-sixteenth of their day on the site."
  • Read on.

Go deeper

Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Voters in Wisconsin, Michigan urged to return absentee ballots to drop boxes

Signs for Joe Biden are seen outside a home in Coon Valle, Wisconsin, on Oct. 3. Photo by KEREM YUCEL via Getty

Wisconsin Democrats and the Democratic attorney general of Michigan are urging voters to return absentee ballots to election clerks’ offices or drop boxes, warning that the USPS may not be able to deliver ballots by the Election Day deadline.

Driving the news: The Supreme Court rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3. In Michigan, absentee ballots must also be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in order to be counted.

46 mins ago - Technology

Facebook warns of "perception hacks" undermining trust in democracy

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Facebook warned Tuesday that bad actors are increasingly taking to social media to create the false perception that they’ve pulled off major hacks of electoral systems or have otherwise seriously disrupted elections.

Why it matters: "Perception hacking," as Facebook calls it, can have dire consequences on people's faith in democracy, sowing distrust, division and confusion among the voters it targets.

Obama: Trump is "jealous of COVID's media coverage"

Former President Barack Obama launched a blistering attack on President Trump while campaigning for Joe Biden in Orlando on Tuesday, criticizing Trump for complaining about the pandemic as cases soar and joking that he's "jealous of COVID's media coverage."

Driving the news: Trump has baselessly accused the news media of only focusing on covering the coronavirus pandemic — which has killed over 226,000 Americans so far and is surging across the country once again — as a way to deter people from voting on Election Day and distract from other issues.