Nov 16, 2017

Apple and Google praised for taking action on conflict minerals

Advocacy group Enough put out a list of the tech and jewelry companies doing the most and least around use of conflict minerals – things like gold, tin, tungsten, and tantalum that are mined in violence-torn parts of the Congo.

Tech giants Apple, Google, Microsoft and HP were at the top of the group's list, with retailers like Costco, Sears, Nieman-Marcus and Walmart at the bottom.

Methodology: The highest possible score is 120 points, but extra credit is possible. Companies are scored based on their commitment to a conflict-free mineral sourcing policy, outside audits, their support for communities in the Congo, and advocacy; Data: The Enough Project; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Not all tech companies good: While the leaders were all big names in tech, a number of companies got low marks, including Samsung and Toshiba

Not all retailers bad: Simialrly, while the lowest marks went to companies that sell jewelry, some such companies got higher scores, including Signet and Tiffany & Co.

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CES isn't what you think it is

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

CES, the annual January trade show in Las Vegas, is many things: a great place to catch up with leaders from throughout the tech industry, a decent chance to spot broad trends and an opportunity to hear stump speeches from big-name CEOs trying to get their companies seen as tech leaders.

What it's not, though, is a place for the most important tech announcements of the year. Companies like Apple, Google and Samsung prefer to launch key products in a less noisy environment, at their own private events.

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Tech's biggest upcoming battles in 2020

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The most consequential stories for tech in 2020 pit the industry's corporate colossi against the U.S. government, foreign nations, and the human needs of their own customers.

Why it matters: Today's tech giants own and operate the informational hubs that increasingly shape our public and private lives. That's putting their products and policies under greater scrutiny than ever before.

Amazon and Big Tech can't escape climate pressure

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

2020's first battle between Big Tech and climate activists is already here, and it won't be the last.

Driving the news: Amazon Employees for Climate Justice (AECJ) yesterday alleged management is trying to prevent employees from continuing to publicly criticize corporate policies.

Go deeperArrowJan 3, 2020