The problem with Rovio going public isn't that the Finnish game maker is best known for its years-old hit, Angry Birds. The problem is that it is onlyknown for the Angry Birds franchise.

The company has proven itself adept at making the most of the hit game, to be sure, spawning years of sequels, merchandise galore, and even a blockbuster movie. The Angry Birds Movie, along with strong game sales, allowed revenue to nearly double last quarter, according to Rovio's earnings report Tuesday.

Yes, but: For a company that has touted itself as the next Disney, Rovio has failed to produce a second hit, let alone the steady string of successes needed to build a true entertainment powerhouse. Despite that, Bloomberg reports that the company wants to go public as soon as next month, raising as much as $400 million at a $2 billion valuation.

My thought bubble: Would-be investors would be wise to study a bit of company history. The company had released dozens of games before its first hit, the original Angry Birds, and nearly went out of business. More recently, the company had to retrench after its growth stalled and in 2015 the company was forced to make massive job cuts as its business came back to earth.

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Post-debate poll finds Biden strong on every major issue

Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
4 hours ago - Science

The murder hornets are here

A braver man than me holds a speciment of the Asian giant hornet. Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Entomologists in Washington state on Thursday discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S.

Why it matters: You may know this insect species by its nom de guerre: "the murder hornet." While the threat they pose to humans has been overstated, the invading hornets could decimate local honeybee populations if they establish themselves.