Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Former tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang announced on Tuesday night that he has dropped out of the 2020 presidential race.

The big picture: Yang, who's never held public office, centered his campaign on universal basic income, wherein he proposed giving all Americans over 18 years of age $1,000 every month.

The state of play: Consistent mid-range polling landed Yang a spot on all but one of the first debate stages — including as the only person of color in the December and February debates.

  • Yang announced his decision in multiple media interviews.
  • He had failed to qualify for the January debate. He asked the Democratic National Committee to commission more early state qualifying polls prior to the event, which the committee declined, per The Daily Beast.
  • He'd hoped more opportunities to qualify could boost diversity on the debate stage, the Beast notes.

Between the lines: Yang argued he was dismissed by the media as a legitimate candidate, despite his strong polling numbers. Following the November Democratic debate, he demanded MSNBC — the event host — apologize for his lack of talk time, as he was the lowest of all the candidates on stage.

  • He was repeatedly left off of graphics of candidates, prompting his supporters to launch a #YangMediaBlackout after an omission from CNN.
  • He gained a dedicated online following, dubbed the #YangGang, that backed him across platforms.

Go deeper: 2020 presidential election: Track the candidates

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The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."

Updated 16 mins ago - Politics & Policy

ActBlue collects a record $91 million in hours after Ginsburg's death

A makeshift memorial in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 19. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

ActBlue received a record $91.4 million in the 28 hours following Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, the Democratic donation-processing site confirmed to Axios late Saturday.

Why it matters via the New York Times: "The unprecedented outpouring shows the power of a looming Supreme Court confirmation fight to motivate Democratic donors."

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 30,674,077 — Total deaths: 955,440— Total recoveries: 20,908,811Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 6,764,803 — Total deaths: 199,258 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  5. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.