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Andreessen Horowitz invests in in digital custody startup Anchor Labs

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

Andreessen Horowitz has invested in Anchor Labs, a stealthy startup planning to provide digital asset custody, according to multiple sources. The startup is raising up to $17 million in Series A funding, according to a Delaware filing from December that Axios obtained from Lagniappe Labs, though it's not clear whether the round has closed yet and who else participated.

Hot commodity: Anchor Labs opted to raise funds after acquisition talks with Coinbase didn't end in a deal. In November, Coinbase unveiled its own plans to provide custody services to institutional investors.

  • Digital asset custody is becoming the next big topic on the investment side of digital tokens because it’s a critical requirement for institutional investors.

Similar to what real estate tech company Compass did for its recent $450 million fundraise, Anchor Labs' Delaware filing includes language that will require approval from a majority of preferred shareholders if it wants to create, issue, or sell digital tokens.

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 4 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the Times. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.