Sep 12, 2017

An electromagnetic quirk might change air conditioning

Ross D. Franklin / AP

The Bay Area's SkyCool Systems is developing a technology that one day might be used to significantly cut energy demands from air conditioning, one of the U.S.'s major draws of electricity, per MIT Technology Review.

  • How it works: SkyCool has developed panels that reflect sunlight at a specific infrared range that allows heat to slip through the atmosphere, allowing their surface to cool — while also cooling the water used in traditional air conditioning systems. Recent results suggest existing buildings can be retrofitted with the technology.
  • By the numbers: The panels could cut energy use in buildings by 10 to 70%, depending on conditions.
  • Why it matters: Should SkyCool's proof-of-concept test pan out (they're currently in field trials), the technology could have a serious impact at hotels, supermarkets and other places that require massive amounts of climate control.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 952,171 — Total deaths: 48,320 — Total recoveries: 202,541Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 216,722 — Total deaths: 5,137 — Total recoveries: 8,672Map.
  3. Stimulus updates: Social Security recipients won't need to file a tax return to receive their checks.
  4. Jobs update: 6.6 million people filed for unemployment last week, a staggering number that eclipses the record set on March 26.
  5. Health updates: The Trump administration won't reopen enrollment for ACA marketplaces this year.
  6. National updates: The Grand Canyon closed after a resident tested positive for coronavirus.
  7. World update: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu re-entered self-quarantine after his health minister tested positive for coronavirus.
  8. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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The weirdest NBA draft ever

Table: Axios Visuals

The 2020 NBA draft was already shaping up to be the weirdest draft in years, and now that the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the sports world, it could be the weirdest draft ever.

Why it matters: While most drafts have a clear hierarchy by the time April rolls around, this draft does not. There's no reliable No. 1 pick, almost every top-10 prospect has a glaring weakness and the global sports hiatus has shrouded the whole class in mystery.

Go deeperArrow27 mins ago - Sports

Jobless claims spike to another weekly record amid coronavirus crisis

A sign in Livingston, Mont. Photo: William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

6.6 million people filed for unemployment last week, a staggering number that eclipses the record set just days ago amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to government data released Thursday.

Why it matters: Efforts to contain the outbreak are continuing to create a jobs crisis, causing the sharpest spikes in unemployment filings in American history.