There's more than just an economic gap between rich and poor families; there is also a growing education gap. When jobs go away in a state, a new study finds, college attendance goes down for children in poor families.

What it means: Education has traditionally been the great equalizer in American society. This study shows the poorest people don't just suffer in the immediate aftermath of a lousy economy - the next generation is affected as the education gulf widens as well.

The numbers: In states where jobs decreased by 7% or more between 1995 and 2011, college attendance by children from the poorest families dropped by 20% – even when financial aid increased in those same states to help them go to college. The college education gap in these states was significant for poor, white families. It was even wider for children from poor, black families.

Poor children in dire economic circumstances suffer from emotional and economic stress, which makes their path towards college even more difficult, the researchers noted. They don't go to college just because they can't afford it; it also takes a toll on them emotionally and in the classroom, further depressing their chances of going to college after high school.

"Rather than clearing a path to new educational opportunities in deindustrializing areas, job destruction knocks many youth off the path to college," the authors wrote.

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The missed opportunities for 2020 and beyond

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Jason Armond (Los Angeles Times), Noam Galai, Jabin Botsford (The Washington Post), Alex Wong/Getty Images

As the 2020 presidential campaign draws to a close, President Trump and Joe Biden have focused little on some of the most sweeping trends that will outlive the fights of the moment.

Why it matters: Both have engaged on some issues, like climate change and China, on their own terms, and Biden has addressed themes like economic inequality that work to his advantage. But others have gone largely unmentioned — a missed opportunity to address big shifts that are changing the country.

Pence chief of staff Marc Short tests positive for coronavirus

Marc Short with Katie Miller, Vice President Pence's communications director, in March. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times via Reuters

Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, tested positive for the coronavirus Saturday and is quarantining, according to a White House statement.

Why it matters: Short is Pence's closest aide, and was one of the most powerful forces on the White House coronavirus task force.