Free market enthusiasts often point to Europe's relatively high unemployment rates as evidence that their more activist labor laws, like mandating paid leave, sick time, and more generous unemployment benefits make it too expensive for employers to create jobs.

But according to a new analysis from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, America's lack of workplace benefits may be causing the U.S. prime-age labor force participation rate — or the share of able-bodied workers aged 25-54 who either have a job or are actively looking for one — to lag behind European competitors.

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Data: OECD; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

What they're saying: The New York Fed economists point to data that shows "the failure of the United States to keep pace in providing more generous workplace benefits accounts for 29 percent of the decline in the nation's labor force participation rate for women relative to that of other high-income countries."

Why it matters: The unemployment rate is at an historically low 4.3%, but despite the obvious demand for labor, participation rates have only inched up slightly since the worst of the recession. This report suggests one reason employers are having trouble drawing Americans back into the labor force is a dearth of paid leave and other benefits that would enable Americans to both take care of their families and work at the same time.

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Ex-officer pleads not guilty to charges related to Breonna Taylor killing

Brett Hankison is charged with three counts of wanton endangerment. Photo: Courtesy by the Shelby County Sherrif's Department

The former Louisville police officer charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection with the raid that led to the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, pleaded "not guilty" on Monday, the Courier Journal reports.

The big picture: The announcement of charges against Brett Hankison, who was fired from the department in June, set off nationwide protests last week. None of the officers involved in the raid were indicted on homicide or manslaughter charges related to Taylor's death.

SurveyMonkey poll: Trump's Ohio bet

Data: SurveyMonkey survey of 3,092 Ohio voters, Sept. 1-25, 2020; Note: COVID-19 was a write-in option; Chart: Axios Visuals

President Trump leads Joe Biden 51%-47% among likely Ohio voters overall — but he holds a whopping 74%-24% lead with those who say a flagging economy and job concerns are their top issue, according to new SurveyMonkey-Tableau data for Axios.

Why it matters: Ohioans are more worried about their jobs than the coronavirus — and that's President Trump's best chance to cling to a narrow lead in this state he won handily in 2016.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 33,224,222 — Total deaths: 999,298 — Total recoveries: 22,975,298Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 7,134,874 — Total deaths: 204,905 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,308,599Map.
  3. States: Cuomo extends New York moratorium on evictions until 2021.
  4. Business: Companies are still holding back earnings guidance.
  5. Health: Trump announces plan to distribute 150 million rapid tests —The childless vaccine.
  6. World: India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases.

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