May 5, 2017

Amazon's video app may finally come to Apple TV

Ina Fried, author of Login

Apple

While you can find many Amazon services on many Apple products, one thing you haven't been able to get is Amazon's video service on Apple TV.

But, according to Recode, the two companies are in talks that could see Amazon Video arrive on Apple TV as early as this summer.

The video battle has been particularly contentious between Apple and Amazon, with Amazon having years ago stopped selling rival streaming devices from Apple and Google in favor of its own Fire TV line. At the time, Amazon noted it didn't want to sell TV hardware that didn't support its video service.

Winners and Losers: It's hard to say without being privy to the negotiations. Apple often gets a 30 percent cut of digital goods sold on its iOS hardware, but it's unclear if different economics might be at play here.

Go deeper

The business of tear gas

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

U.S. forces yesterday used tear gas on peaceful protesters outside the White House gates, prior to a declared curfew, clearing a path for President Trump to visit a riot-damaged church for a photo opportunity.

The state of play: Two of the largest U.S. producers of tear gas are owned by private equity firms, but those firms have no interest in discussing their ownership.

Exclusive: Washington Post makes major move into local news

People entering the Washington Post building in D.C. in 2019. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

The Washington Post has signed all 30 of McClatchy's local news outlets to its Zeus Performance product, a software that gives sites better speed, ad view-ability and performance, executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: By adding more local news outlets, The Post can start to build a local news ecosystem within its tech stack.

Biden: George Floyd's last words are "a wake-up call for our nation"

Former Vice President Joe Biden meets with clergy members and community activists during a visit to Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del. on June 1, 2020. Photo: JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden will call George Floyd’s dying words “a wake-up call for our nation,” and criticize President Trump’s decision to unleash tear gas on peaceful protesters outside the White House, in a civil rights speech from Philadelphia on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Biden in the address will seek to draw a sharp contrast between himself and Trump, whose first remarks addressing nationwide unrest Monday highlighted law and order, extreme demonstrations of militarized “strength” and other blustery threats.