Oct 5, 2017

Amazon sinks its teeth into MBA recruiting

Jeff Bezos, CEO and founder of Amazon. Photo: Reed Saxon / AP

"Amazon.com is flooding the zone at business-school recruiting events — drawing overflow crowds and irking other recruiters," writes Wall Street Journal's Kelsey Gee.

The takeaway: "Many big banks and consulting firms now want to know when Amazon is coming to campus so they can schedule their visits for a different day and avoid going head-to-head for an audience."

  • "Amazon has hired some 1,000 M.B.A.s in the past year ... a drop in the bucket for a company that plans to add 50,000 software developers in the next year."
  • "The talent wars begin even before classes do. This past June, Amazon sponsored an event at its Seattle headquarters for 650 soon-to-be first-year and returning women M.B.A. students, some of whom left the event with internship offers for summer 2018."
  • Why it matters: "Tech companies, once averse to hiring PowerPoint-loving B-school grads, have embraced them in the past few years."
  • Miriam Park, Amazon's director of university programs, "said business students understand Amazon's customer-obsessed ethos and tend to be 'risk oriented,' scrappy and analytical."
  • How they do it: "Amazon's campus recruiters descend en masse and are in almost-constant touch with students ... Amazon might have eight or 10 alumni working large events or hosting coffee meetings for one-on-one conversations with students, compared with a typical one or two presenters from other companies. 'It's been a huge volume play.'"

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