Ted S. Warren / AP

About 50 senior Amazon leaders flew in from Seattle this week to meet with the Trump administration and lawmakers on transportation issues, ranging from trucking to drones.

The team, led by SVP of Worldwide Operations Dave Clark, oversees everything that takes place from the time a you buy a product on the website to when the box lands on your doorstep — basically, a ton of transportation logistics. Last night Amazon hosted a reception for members of Congress who have Amazon jobs in their states and districts.

Why it matters: Amazon needs strong allies in Washington as it moves into delivering goods in addition to selling them. So far, it's a pretty positive story for Amazon: Last month, it announced the creation of an Air Cargo Hub in Kentucky to support its new fleet of Prime Air planes, creating some 2,000 new jobs. In January, the company said it plans to create 100,000 new jobs in the U.S. by 2018 — an effort surely not lost on Trump, who traded barbs with Amazon boss Jeff Bezos during the campaign.

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Appeals court allows House Democrats to continue lawsuit for Don McGahn testimony

Don McGahn in an October 2018 Cabinet meeting. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A D.C. appeals court on Friday allowed House Democrats to continue their case for testimony from former White House counsel Don McGahn before the House Judiciary Committee.

Why it matters: The ruling has broader implications beyond this specific instance, agreeing that Congress has the standing to sue to enforce subpoenas against executive branch officials even if the White House refuses to comply.

There's little consensus on TikTok's specific national security threat

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

TikTok has become a Rorschach test for how U.S. politicians view China, with little consensus on the specifics of its threat to homeland security.

The big picture: Much of what D.C. fears about TikTok is fear itself, and that's reflected in President Trump's executive order to ban the app by Sept. 20 if it's not sold by parent company ByteDance — alongside another focused on Chinese messaging app WeChat and its parent company Tencent.

U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam

Photo: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

The Treasury Department on Friday placed sanctions on Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, following months of tension as she has allowed continued overreach by Beijing to subvert Hong Kong's autonomy.

Why it matters: It's the toughest sanction yet imposed on China for its destruction of Hong Kong’s relatively free political system.