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Rebecca Zisser / Axios

Even for the biggest political junkies, this week's twice-daily, jaw-dropping news scoops were hard to keep up with. The New York Times and Washington Post took turns dropping bombshell report after bombshell report on the President.

Some perspective: It was only two weeks and two days ago that President Trump, Mike Pence and Paul Ryan were celebrating outside the White House after passing the GOP's health care bill. It feels like a distant dream.

Monday night: New York Times reports that Trump had disclosed confidential information to the Russian ambassador during their meeting the week before. It was legal, but brought Trump's judgement and understanding of how to handle sensitive information into question.

Tuesday morning: New York Times announces that it was Israel's confidential information that Trump disclosed to Russia, who is allied with Iran — Israel's adversary. It also came out that Israel had been warned about giving the Trump administration this kind of information.

Tuesday night: The Washington Post reports that according to a memo written by Comey, Trump had asked the then-FBI Director to let go of the investigation into Flynn, claiming Flynn was a good guy.

Wednesday night: New York Times reports that the Trump team knew that Flynn was under investigation for failing to disclose that he had lobbied for Turkey. McClatchy reported that Flynn had delayed a plan to retake the ISIS stronghold in Raqqa — an attack that Turkey opposed.

Thursday morning: Reuters reports that the Trump campaign had 18 undisclosed contacts with Russians during the campaign.

Friday afternoon: New York Times reports that Trump also told the Russians that James Comey was a "nut job" and he was relieved to have fired him at their meeting earlier this month. The Washington Post reported that the FBI had identified a White House official close to Trump who is "a significant person of interest" for the Russia probe.

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

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