May 20, 2017

All the bombshell Trump stories that broke this week

Rebecca Zisser / Axios

Even for the biggest political junkies, this week's twice-daily, jaw-dropping news scoops were hard to keep up with. The New York Times and Washington Post took turns dropping bombshell report after bombshell report on the President.

Some perspective: It was only two weeks and two days ago that President Trump, Mike Pence and Paul Ryan were celebrating outside the White House after passing the GOP's health care bill. It feels like a distant dream.

Monday night: New York Times reports that Trump had disclosed confidential information to the Russian ambassador during their meeting the week before. It was legal, but brought Trump's judgement and understanding of how to handle sensitive information into question.

Tuesday morning: New York Times announces that it was Israel's confidential information that Trump disclosed to Russia, who is allied with Iran — Israel's adversary. It also came out that Israel had been warned about giving the Trump administration this kind of information.

Tuesday night: The Washington Post reports that according to a memo written by Comey, Trump had asked the then-FBI Director to let go of the investigation into Flynn, claiming Flynn was a good guy.

Wednesday night: New York Times reports that the Trump team knew that Flynn was under investigation for failing to disclose that he had lobbied for Turkey. McClatchy reported that Flynn had delayed a plan to retake the ISIS stronghold in Raqqa — an attack that Turkey opposed.

Thursday morning: Reuters reports that the Trump campaign had 18 undisclosed contacts with Russians during the campaign.

Friday afternoon: New York Times reports that Trump also told the Russians that James Comey was a "nut job" and he was relieved to have fired him at their meeting earlier this month. The Washington Post reported that the FBI had identified a White House official close to Trump who is "a significant person of interest" for the Russia probe.

Go deeper

CDC: Coronavirus antibodies could give "short-term immunity," but more data is needed

CDC Director Robert Redfield briefs reporters on April 8. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus antibody tests are still relatively unreliable, and scientists still aren't sure whether people who get the virus are immune to getting it again, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cautioned on Tuesday.

What they're saying: The agency explicitly warned against using antibody tests to determine whether someone should return to work or to group people within schools or prisons.

Trump accuses Twitter of interfering in 2020 election

President Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Photo: Mandel Ngan/Getty Images

President Trump responded via tweets Tuesday evening to Twitter fact-checking him for the first time on his earlier unsubstantiated posts claiming mail-in ballots in November's election would be fraudulent.

What he's saying: "Twitter is now interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election.They are saying my statement on Mail-In Ballots, which will lead to massive corruption and fraud, is incorrect, based on fact-checking by Fake News CNN and the Amazon Washington Post," the president tweeted. "Twitter is completely stifling FREE SPEECH, and I, as President, will not allow it to happen!"

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 5,584,091 — Total deaths: 349,894 — Total recoveries — 2,284,242Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 1,680,301 — Total deaths: 98,875 — Total recoveries: 384,902 — Total tested: 14,907,041Map.
  3. Federal response: DOJ investigates meatpacking industry over soaring beef pricesMike Pence's press secretary returns to work.
  4. Congress: House Republicans to sue Nancy Pelosi in effort to block proxy voting.
  5. Business: How the new workplace could leave parents behind.
  6. Tech: Twitter fact-checks Trump's tweets about mail-in voting for first timeGoogle to open offices July 6 for 10% of workers.
  7. Public health: CDC releases guidance on when you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus.
  8. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

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Updated 46 mins ago - Politics & Policy