"Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek has stage 4 pancreatic cancer. Photo: Santiago Felipe/Getty Images

“Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek announced Tuesday on "Good Morning America" that he will undergo another round of chemotherapy for stage 4 pancreatic cancer, a month after returning to work and telling fans that he's "on the mend."

Why it matters: Despite overall cancer survival rates improving in the U.S., pancreatic cancer is known to be very deadly and tends to be diagnosed at a more advanced stage.

What he's saying:

  • "I was doing so well. And my numbers went down to the equivalent of a normal human being who does not have pancreatic cancer. So we were all very optimistic."
  • After the start of immunotherapy, Trebek said he lost about 12 pounds in a week and his numbers skyrocketed "to much higher than they were when I was first diagnosed. So, the doctors have decided that I have to undergo chemo again and that's what I'm doing."
  • "When [the cancer] happened early on I was down on myself. I didn't realize how fallible each of us is in his or her own way … I talk to the audience sometimes and I get teary eyed for no reason. I don't even bother to explain it anymore, I just experience it. I know it's a part of who I am and I just keep going.”

Go deeper: As cancer mortality declines, gap between rich and poor emerges

Go deeper

Florida fully lifts coronavirus restrictions on restaurants

Photo: Don Juan Moore/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced Friday the state will completely reopen its economy, allowing restaurants at operate full capacity and barring localities from ordering businesses to close.

Why it matters: The state became one of the world's epicenters for the virus in July, forcing DeSantis to pause its first round of reopening.

2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Eyeing the end of gas-powered cars

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Gasoline-powered cars may be going the way of the woolly mammoth, even if it will take decades to replace them and seems hard to fathom today.

The big picture: Internal combustion engines (ICEs) have powered automobiles for more than 100 years. But the shift to electric vehicles, slow to materialize at first, is now accelerating due to tightening government policies, falling costs and a societal reckoning about climate change.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D) and his wife, Pamela, both tested positive for coronavirus, his office announced on Friday.

The state of play: The Northams were tested after one of their staff "who works closely within the couple's living quarters" tested positive. The governor is asymptomatic, while his wife is "experiencing mild symptoms." They plan to isolate at home for 10 days.

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