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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Business travel could settle into a "new normal" that's 10%-20% lower than before the COVID-19 pandemic, Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian recently suggested per AP.

What they're saying: With the coronavirus pandemic still raging, demand for flights has dwindled. Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly told AP that overall passenger revenue is down 70%. Business travel — normally more than a third of Southwest's traffic — is off by 90%.

The big picture: The pandemic has proven that working from home can be a viable option, which may reduce business travel even after the global outbreak is over.

  • TSA screenings on Tuesday were one-third of what they were the same day in 2019 — 800,000 vs. 2.5 million.

Go deeper

Air travel's COVID-created future

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Ann Ronan Pictures, Bettmann/Getty Images

A look at the future of air travel as we head into the Thanksgiving holiday week while coronavirus cases are surging and the CDC is urging Americans to avoid travel.

Nov 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Some air travelers pay premium for social distancing

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Business travel remains depressed during the pandemic, but some airlines are seeing more leisure travelers in their first-class cabins.

Why it matters: Many people are avoiding air travel during the public health crisis, fearful they'll catch COVID-19 from a nearby passenger. But for those who can afford it, premium class seats offer more comfort and perhaps a little extra breathing room.

Boeing 737 Max's next hurdle: coronavirus

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Bettmann, Stephen Brashear, Ann Ronan Pictures/Getty Images

Boeing is nearing the end of a crippling stretch after the grounding of it 737 MAX last year, while trudging through another one: the pandemic.

Why it matters: Boeing's most popular jet was given the nod to fly again this week, but the world has changed in the 20 months that regulators kept the 737 MAX jet from the skies.