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Expand chart
Data: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Chart: Axios Visuals

The universe of people covered by the Affordable Care Act keeps narrowing.

Between the lines: People who make too much money to qualify for help paying their premiums are fleeing the ACA’s insurance exchanges. But the exchanges are still pretty stable for people who receive premium subsidies, according to new federal data.

You can see two clear trends in these data.

  • First, unsubsidized enrollment has fallen as premiums continue to rise. That makes sense: If you’re on the hook for your entire premium, you’re more likely to bail when those premiums rise.
  • Overall enrollment tapered off under the Trump administration, which also makes sense: Trump’s policy decisions contributed to big premium spikes in 2018, and he has also expanded access to non-ACA options that may be more attractive to healthier, unsubsidized people.

My thought bubble: This is the continuation of a somewhat ironic trend. As the ACA’s coverage expansion has shrunk, the law has evolved to look more like a traditionally liberal health care program.

  • Part of the initial goal was to create a competitive marketplace that would benefit even the middle-class households too wealthy for a premium subsidy.
  • That’s the part that has fallen by the wayside as the ACA’s coverage expansion has narrowed down. Now it’s mainly direct government assistance — through Medicaid and premium subsidies — that’s concentrated among the poorest households.

Go deeper: The ACA is smaller, weaker and more liberal than Obama intended

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.