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Adobe's San Jose, California, headquarters. Photo: Ina Fried/Axios

When you think of impressive tech company campuses, Adobe's San Jose skyscrapers don't always come to mind. But they've come a long way since the drab gray office-laden areas that the company first set up in the 1990s.

The big picture: Thanks to ongoing renovations, most teams have done away with offices in favor of the Silicon Valley standard of open-plan cubicles combined with conference rooms and quiet spaces.

Why it matters: Attractive workspaces, good cafeterias and other perks help recruit in the super-tight Silicon Valley labor market. Plus, a company focused on creativity the way Adobe is needs an office that helps spark new ideas.

Some of Adobe's call booths have an extra layer of flair, especially those on the floor housing the Photoshop team. The coolest one pays tribute to the first version of the software, dating to 1990. In addition to a working Macintosh Classic running Photoshop 1.0, there is a PowerBook 170 as well as a cassette player, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures and a clunky Nokia cell phone.

Other rooms on the floor pay tribute to later releases, including a 1994-themed room with a "Pulp Fiction" poster and boombox, along with a copy of Photoshop 3.0. A later room, devoted to the 2003 debut of Creative Suite, contains a blueberry iBook and a signed poster of Carson Daly.

  • Then there's the basketball court in the middle and the skywalks connecting the buildings. Plus the gift shop, with some great kids' wear, including a T-shirt that says "I'm not messy, I'm creative" and a onesie that says "That's not drool. It's art."

What's next: Adobe has just broken ground on a 4th tower that will be able to hold more people than the other 3 combined (4,000 vs. the 3,500 workers in the current 3 buildings).

Go deeper

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2 hours ago - Health

Pfizer CEO feels "liberated" after taking COVID vaccine

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla. Photo: "Axios on HBO"

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla tells "Axios on HBO" that he recently received his first of two doses of the company's coronavirus vaccine.

Why it matters: Bourla told CNBC in December that company polling found that one of the most effective ways to increase confidence in the vaccine was to have the CEO take it.

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Ripple CEO: SEC lawsuit is "bad for crypto" in the U.S.

Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse tells "Axios on HBO" that if his company loses a lawsuit brought by U.S. regulators, it would put the country at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to cryptocurrencies.

Between the lines: The SEC in December sued Ripple, and Garlinghouse personally, for allegedly selling over $1.3 billion in unregistered securities. Ripple's response is that its cryptocurrency, called XRP, didn't require registration because it's an asset rather than a security.

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Pfizer CEO: "It will be terrible" if COVID-19 vaccine prices limit access

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla told "Axios on HBO" that it "will be terrible for society" if the price of coronavirus vaccines ever prohibits some people from taking them.

Why it matters: Widespread uptake of the vaccine — which might require annual booster shots — will reduce the risk of the virus continuing to spread and mutate, but it's unclear who will pay for future shots or how much they'll cost.