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NASA/AP

NASA probes found a human-made "barrier" is surrounding Earth and protecting the planet from space weather, according to a report published in Science Space Review. The barrier can form when very low frequency (VLF) radio waves — largely used for submarine communications and scientific studies — interact with particles in space.

Why it matters: Earth is bombarded with intense radiation and energy ejected from the sun that can sometimes disrupt satellite communications and power grids. Scientists plan to investigate whether ultimately they could purposely use VLF signals to push this excess radiation farther away from Earth.

The discovery: Researchers found that the barrier, which forms under certain conditions, has actually been pushing Earth's Van Allen radiation belts away for decades. Using satellite data, they compared the inner edge of those belts today vs. in the 1960s when there were fewer VLF communications, and discovered the inner edge is farther away today.

Two quick things:

  • VLF communications are weaker frequencies usually used to transfer coded messages across long distances or under deep water, but their use has evolved over the last 50 years.
  • Earth's two Van Allen belts are collections of charged particles, largely from solar winds, trapped in rings by the planet's magnetic field. The inner belt sits 400 to 6,000 miles above Earth's surface and the outer is 8,400 to 36,000 miles above.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
28 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.

Trump political team disavows "Patriot Party" groups

Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.

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