Mediafax via AP

A 22-year-old British cybersecurity researcher thwarted yesterday's "Wanna Decryptor 2.0" cyberattack that affected computers worldwide by spending nearly $11, the Washington Post reports.

The "kill switch": The cybersecurity expert figured out there was a hidden "kill switch" (an unregistered domain) within the malware that was locking users out of their computers. By buying a domain ending with "gwea.com" and registering a website, all for $10.69, he was able to activate the hidden kill switch — potentially saving companies worldwide billions of dollars.

Read the entire process of how this 22-year-old stopped a global cybersecurity attack on his blog.

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
10 mins ago - Economy & Business

United States of burnout

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Postponed vacations, holidays in isolation and back-to-back virtual meetings are taking a toll on millions of American workers.

Why it matters: As we head into the fall, workers are feeling the burnout. Such a collective fraying of mental health at work could dampen productivity and hinder economic growth across the country.

Updated 50 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:15 p.m. ET: 33,477,825 — Total deaths: 1,003,922 — Total recoveries: 23,209,109Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:15 p.m. ET: 7,176,111 — Total deaths: 205,676 — Total recoveries: 2,794,608 — Total tests: 102,342,416Map.
  3. Health: Americans won't take Trump's word on the vaccine, Axios-Ipsos poll finds.
  4. States: NYC's coronavirus positivity rate spikes to highest since June.
  5. Sports: Tennessee Titans close facility amid NFL's first coronavirus outbreak.
  6. World: U.K. beats previous record for new coronavirus cases.

Mueller defends Russia investigation in rare public statement

Photo: David Hume Kennerly/GettyImages

Former special counsel Robert Mueller in a statement on Tuesday defended his team's handling of the Russia investigation after Andrew Weissmann, a former prosecutor in his office, wrote in a new book that investigators should have done more to hold President Trump accountable.

Driving the news: In the tell-all book, “Where Law Ends,” released on Tuesday, Weissman addresses what he calls the special prosecutor office's failures in its investigation.