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Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Last week, President Trump discussed one of his key traits: "I like to think of myself as a very flexible person." This week, his flexibility was on full display on everything from China, to NATO to his legislative priorities:

1. China's currency

Nov. 9, 2015 (WSJ Op-ed)

"On Day One of a Trump administration, the U.S. Treasury Department will designate China a currency manipulator."

Wednesday (WSJ interview)

"They're not currency manipulators."

2. Export/Import Bank

Aug. 26, 2015 (Bloomberg interview)

"I don't like it because I don't think it's necessary."

Wednesday (WSJ interview)

"It's a very good thing and actually it makes money."

3. NATO

January 15, 2017 (Bild interview)

"It's obsolete, first because it was designed many, many years ago. Secondly, countries aren't paying what they should."

Wednesday (Press conference)

"I said it was obsolete. It's no longer obsolete."

4. Janet Yellen

May 5, 2016 (CNBC interview)

"When her time is up I would most likely replace because of the fact it would be appropriate."

Wednesday (WSJ interview)

Trump has "respect" for her and she's "not toast" when her term is up. He added, "I do like a low-interest rate policy, I must be honest with you."

5. National debt

April 2, 2016 (Washington Post interview)

Trump said he would eliminate the National Debt "over a period of eight years."

Wednesday (CNBC interview)

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney: "I think it's fairly safe to assume that was hyperbole."

6. Health care

March 24, 2017 (To reporters in Oval Office)

Trump says he's "moving on" from health care: "We will probably be going right now for tax reform."

Tuesday (Fox Business interview)

"We have to do health care first."

7. Tax reform

February 23, 2017 (CNBC interview)

Treasury Secretary Mnuchin: "We want to get this done by the August recess."

Wednesday (Fox Business interview)

"By putting a deadline, they say, 'Oh, Trump didn't make it…. I don't wanna put deadlines."

8. James Comey

July 5 (Twitter)

"FBI director said Crooked Hillary compromised our national security. No charges. Wow! #RiggedSystem"

January 24

Trump asks Comey to stay on as FBI director.

Wednesday (Fox Business interview)

He said it was too late to fire him for not supporting his wiretapping claims. "We'll see what happens. You know, it's going to be interesting."

9. Russia

2016 campaign

Trump repeatedly defended Putin and praised his strong leadership in contrast to Obama's "weak" leadership.

Wednesday (New York Times)

"I think it's a very sad day for Russia because they're aligned, and in this case, all information points to Syria that they did this."

Honorable mentions:

Hiring freeze: In January, Trump signed an executive order implementing the hiring freeze, and on Wednesday, he lifted it.

Syria: In 2013, Trump repeatedly tweeted against invading Syria and for Obama getting Congressional approval before bombing. Last week, Trump signed off on the strikes to Syrian airfields without Congressional approval. This isn't a total flip-flop. Trump has been notably pro-bomb — promising to "bomb the hell out of ISIS" — and in a mostly-overlooked interview with Circa last year, said that the use of chemical weapons would be his "red line."

Go deeper

Tech scrambles to derail inauguration threats

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Tech companies are sharing more information with law enforcement in a frantic effort to prevent violence around the inauguration, after the government was caught flat-footed by the Capitol siege.

Between the lines: Tech knows it will be held accountable for any further violence that turns out to have been planned online if it doesn't act to stop it.

Dave Lawler, author of World
5 hours ago - World

Uganda's election: Museveni declared winner, Wine claims fraud

Wine rejected the official results of the election. Photo: Sumy Sadruni/AFP via Getty

Yoweri Museveni was declared the winner of a sixth presidential term on Saturday, with official results giving him 59% to 35% for Bobi Wine, the singer-turned-opposition leader.

Why it matters: This announcement was predictable, as the election was neither free nor fair and Museveni had no intention of surrendering power after 35 years. But Wine — who posed a strong challenged to Museveni, particularly in urban areas, and was beaten and arrested during the campaign — has said he will present evidence of fraud. The big question is whether he will mobilize mass resistance in the streets.

Off the Rails

Episode 1: A premeditated lie lit the fire

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 1: Trump’s refusal to believe the election results was premeditated. He had heard about the “red mirage” — the likelihood that early vote counts would tip more Republican than the final tallies — and he decided to exploit it.

"Jared, you call the Murdochs! Jason, you call Sammon and Hemmer!”

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