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Photo: Brynn Anderson / AP

Roy Moore is the Republican nominee for Senate in Alabama. He's been backed by Steve Bannon from the beginning — the one who championed the far-right, populist rhetoric behind Trump's campaign and victory.

Supporters: President Trump, Steve Bannon, Republican National Committee

Platform: Moore is anti-establishment, "tough on crime," tough on immigration, anti-LGBTQ rights and anti-abortion. He has said homosexuality should be illegal and Muslims should not be allowed to serve in the U.S. Congress.

Background:

  • In 2001, Moore, who was a former attorney and then circuit judge, was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama.
  • He was first removed from the position in 2003 after he refused to remove a large, marble statue of the Ten Commandments from the judicial building.
  • He ran for Alabama governor in 2006 and 2010, but lost both times in the primaries.
  • He was then re-appointed in 2013, but was again suspended in 2016 for advising Alabama judges to continue enforcing the state's ban on same-sex marriage even after the U.S. Supreme Court deemed the law unconstitutional. He lost an appeal to regain his position as chief justice, and then announced he was running for Senate.

Go deeper

Avril Haines confirmed as director of national intelligence

Haines. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Image

Avril Haines was quickly confirmed by the Senate on Wednesday as the director of national intelligence (DNI) in a vote of 84-10.

Why it matters: Haines is the first of President Biden's nominees to receive a full Senate confirmation and she will be the first woman to serve as DNI. She's previously served as CIA deputy director from 2013 to 2015 and deputy national security adviser from 2015 to 2017.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

Biden delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the Capitol. Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: The Celebrate America event, with remarks by Biden and Harris.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

President Biden faces a deeply broken America

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As President Biden begins his term in office today, he'll be tasked with leading a country beset with deep, long-term problems.

Why it matters: Though the pandemic has made them worse, existential challenges around inequality, social alienation and political division in the U.S. were in place well before SARS-CoV-2 arrived on American shores. The country's future will depend in large part on whether the choices made over the next four years can flatten the curve of American decline.