Dec 27, 2017

5. Chernoff emoji cartogram

This visualization is a modified version of Chernoff Faces, a technique that maps multiple statistical values to the features of a face. Because it's 2017, we expanded on the technique and made Chernoff Emojis. Each part of the emoji is controlled by the state's ranking in a given metric, which range from the uninsured rate to the percent of adults who report getting enough sleep.

Data: U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control, Bureau of Labor Statistics; Graphic: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Go deeper: The Emoji States of America

Go deeper

Study: 49% of American adults projected to be obese by 2030

A new study published by the New England Journal of Medicine estimates that almost half of American adults are expected be obese by 2030, and about 25% will be severely obese.

The big picture: The report used data from a decades-long federal study, while previous estimates typically rely on national health surveys, AP reports. The study found the prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults will vary across states and demographic subgroups.

Go deeperArrowDec 21, 2019

Big Tech data centers probably aren't a climate change time bomb

Data: Reproduced from an International Energy Agency report; Chart: Axios Visuals

An International Energy Agency analysis pushes back against concerns that data centers are a ticking carbon bomb as use of web-connected devices expands.

Where it stands: Power use by data centers consumes about 1% of global power (which isn't trivial in a world of still-rising emissions) and has changed little since 2015, they report.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

California sees drop in youth population, Texas sees a jump

Photo: Stephen Simpson/Getty Images

California's youth population dropped by more than 400,000 throughout the past 10 years to 8.9 million young people, attributed, in part, to a drop in immigrant inflows and the state’s lowest birth rate in history, Bloomberg reports, citing the latest Census data.

The big picture: The youth slump is a trend across the U.S., where 30 states noted a dip in the under-18 age group between 2010 and 2019, newly released data shows.

Go deeperArrowJan 11, 2020