Hickenlooper at an Axios event. Photo: Chuck Kennedy / Axios

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) — who has a countdown clock on his iPhone showing how many days he has left in office — left little mystery about his plans when asked about running for president:

  • "We've got 321 days of focus — not to say that my wife and I don't occasionally have discussions, but we're focused on getting things done."
  • On what his wife, Robin Pringle, thinks of his running for president: "She thinks it's hilarious. [Laughter] But ... she also thinks it's interesting. So, we'll see what those discussions — where they go."

Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) — who ate dinner with Hickenlooper on Thursday night, as part of a buddy act that has included a health-care policy rollout — told ABC's Jonathan Karl on "This Week":

  • “We may be beginning to see the end of a two-party system."
  • "I'm starting to really wonder if we are going to see a multi-party system at some point in the future in this country. Because I don't think either party is answering people's deepest concerns and needs.”

Go deeper

There's little consensus on TikTok's specific national security threat

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

TikTok has become a Rorschach test for how U.S. politicians view China, with little consensus on the specifics of its threat to homeland security.

The big picture: Much of what D.C. fears about TikTok is fear itself, and that's reflected in President Trump's executive order to ban the app by Sept. 20 if it's not sold by parent company ByteDance — alongside another focused on Chinese messaging app WeChat and its parent company Tencent.

U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam

Photo: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

The Treasury Department on Friday placed sanctions on Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, following months of tension as she has allowed continued overreach by Beijing to subvert Hong Kong's autonomy.

Why it matters: It's the toughest sanction yet imposed on China for its destruction of Hong Kong’s relatively free political system.

GM's high-stakes electric move

The Cadillac Lyriq. Image courtesy of Cadillac

Cadillac on Thursday unveiled the Lyriq, the luxury brand's first all-electric model and GM's first consumer electric vehicle unveil since the Chevy Bolt several years ago.

Why it matters: It's the first reveal by GM of an electric vehicle that will use the company's new modular platform and Ultium battery system — technologies meant to underpin the 20 electric vehicles that GM plans to launch by 2023.