2020 Democratic candidates in Columbia, S.C., on Jan 20. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

With the "phase one" trade deal signed, major asset managers have taken their eyes off the trade war a bit and begun to focus on the upcoming U.S. presidential election.

Why it matters: The outcome of November's election is now investors' top concern, according to the results of Bank of America Securities' latest global fund manager survey.

  • The trade war dropped to the No. 2 concern among respondents for the first time since May, while worries about a "bond bubble" popping rose to the No. 3 worry.

Watch this space: A number of recent analyses have found that the stock market is currently showing some irrational exuberance, but BofA's model shows "investors are bullish but not euphoric,” chief investment strategist Michael Hartnett said in a note.

  • The level of cash holdings has not yet reached the point that would signal excessive "greed," and overweight positions in stocks remain well below levels that signal concern.

Of note: Inflation expectations rose 14 percentage points from last month to net 56% of participants, the highest level since November 2018.

  • 19% of fund managers surveyed think the global economy will experience above-trend growth and below-trend inflation; 62% continue to expect below-trend growth and inflation.
  • Global corporate profit expectations jumped 14 percentage points from December, with a net 27% of respondents saying they expect profits to improve over the next 12 months, the highest level since March 2018.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 11,294,859 — Total deaths: 531,419 — Total recoveries — 6,078,552Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 2,839,917 — Total deaths: 129,676 — Total recoveries: 894,325 — Total tested: 34,858,427Map.
  3. States: Photos of America's pandemic July 4 ICU beds in Arizona hot spot near capacity.
  4. Public health: U.S. coronavirus infections hit record highs for 3 straight days.
  5. Politics: Trump extends PPP application deadlineKimberly Guilfoyle tests positive.
  6. World: Mexican leaders call for tighter border control as infections rise in U.S.
  7. Sports: 31 MLB players test positive as workouts resume.
  8. 1 📽 thing: Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback.