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Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

U.S. Census Bureau field workers may appear in areas with low response rates next week as part of the next push to boost participation in the count.

Why it matters: The pandemic interfered with door-to-door canvassing, and so far, nearly four in 10 U.S. households have not yet responded.

What to watch: Starting next week, workers will be stationed with tablets outside grocery stores, pharmacies and libraries in areas with low participation rates.

  • The following week, door knocking will begin for households who've not yet filled out a form.
  • The nationwide door knocking campaign will begin Aug. 11.
  • The extended deadline for the completed count is Oct. 31.

The big picture: This is the first year the census form can be filled out online, but those who have not yet responded are less likely to do so digitally. Door-to-door efforts have been most effective at reaching hard-to-count communities in past years.

Bureau officials noted in a press call Wednesday that it has obtained 40 million PPE items — including 2.5 million masks and 48,000 gallons of hand sanitizer — for field staff. About 500,000 temporary workers will be stationed across 248 local offices.

Households can respond by mailing back the paper questionnaire they received, by responding online at 2020census.gov, or by phone at 844-330-2020.

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Oct 14, 2020 - Technology

More tech companies plan to let workers stay remote post-pandemic

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A growing number of tech companies say workers need not ever come back to the office if they don't want to. The move comes as pandemic-related closures have already kept many tech workers out of the office for months.

Why it matters: Technology's spread into every corner of the broader economy keeps boosting demand for workers with tech skills. That pushes employers to accommodate tech talent wherever they find it.

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.