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What we're driving: 2019 Lincoln Nautilus

Driver assistance features in Lincoln's 2019 Nautilus
Driver assistance features in Lincoln's 2019 Nautilus. Photo: Lincoln

This week I'm driving a 2019 Lincoln Nautilus, which is the reinvented and much improved version of the former Lincoln MKX.

Why it matters: We should first applaud Lincoln's decision to ditch those alphabet-soup model names that every other luxury maker seems to favor. Next month at the New York auto show, it will introduce the compact Corsair — adding to its lineup of properly named crossovers: Aviator, Nautilus and Navigator.

What's new: Besides its name and two new turbocharged engine choices, every Nautilus comes with standard Lincoln Co-Pilot360, which bundles popular, advanced driver-assist features that were previously available only as separate options.

  • The system includes automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring, and a lane keeping system that can nudge you back into your lane.
  • The lane-keeping system, which works above 40 mph, can be customized to provide an alert (low, normal or high), steering aid or a combination of the two.
  • The Nautilus is also available with evasive steering assist to help swerve around an obstacle if braking isn't enough.
  • Lane-centering technology, which detects lane markings on the road to help keep the vehicle centered, is also available. When used with adaptive cruise control, drivers can set a desired speed and distance between themselves and the vehicle ahead.

My thought bubble: Lincoln's lane-centering technology is not a hands-off highway system, though. Every time I tried to relax with the system engaged, I got various warnings to make sure my hands were on the wheel.

The bottom line: The Nautilus is a luxurious and capable competitor in a crowded midsize luxury crossover market.

Go deeper: See what else Joann has been driving