Aug 8, 2018

2018 officially has record number of women nominees

Organizers of the annual women's march. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Here's your proof that 2018 is the year of the woman: there are now at least 183 women nominees for U.S. House and 11 women nominees for governor — the highest in history, per the Center for American Women and Politics.

Be smart: Most of the nominees are running as Democrats, which could be a huge advantage for their party come November.

Before this election cycle, 167 women was the record for major party nominees for U.S. House and the previous record for women nominees for governor (10) was set in 1994.

Meet the women who won in August 7 primaries:

  1. Gretchen Whitmer, Democratic nominee for governor in Michigan
  2. Laura Kelly, Democratic nominee for governor in Kansas
  3. Debbie Stabenow, Democratic senator and nominee for re-election in Michigan
  4. Claire McCaskill, Democratic senator and nominee for re-election in Missouri
  5. Maria Cantwell, Democratic senator and nominee for re-election in Washington
  6. Susan Hutchison, Republican nominee for U.S. Senate in Washington
  7. Cathy Albro, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 3rd district
  8. Gretchen Driskell, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 7th district
  9. Elissa Slotkin, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 8th district
  10. Candius Stearns, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Michigan's 9th district
  11. Kimberly Bizon, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 10th district
  12. Haley Stevens, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 11th district
  13. Debbie Dingell, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Michigan's 12th district
  14. Rashida Tlaib, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Michigan's 13th district, who will be the first Muslim woman elected to Congress.
  15. Brenda Lawrence, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Michigan's 14th district
  16. Ann Wagner, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Missouri's 2nd district
  17. Katy Geppert, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Missouri's 3rd district
  18. Hallie Thompson, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Missouri's 4th district
  19. Vicky Hartzler, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Missouri's 4th district
  20. Kathy Ellis, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Missouri's 8th district
  21. Sarah Swain, Democratic nominee for Attorney General in Kansas
  22. Sharice Davids, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Kansas' 3rd district
  23. Carolyn Long, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Washington's 3rd district
  24. Suzan DelBene, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Washington's 1st district
  25. Christine Brown, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Washington's 4th district
  26. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Republican congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Washington's 5th district
  27. Lisa Brown, Democratic nominee for U.S. House in Washington's 5th district
  28. Pramila Jayapal, Democratic congresswoman and nominee for re-election in Washington's 7th district

One more thing: Tonight's primaries pit two Trump-backed men against Democratic women in November in Michigan's gubernatorial and U.S. Senate races.

This post has been updated with the new record number of women after more primaries were called on Aug. 8,

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